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from grand central west the place that will be the biggest building west of mississippi where high-speed rail will be there so transportation can bring all of the people from all over california to compliment the style of those two towers arrest i'm looking forward of seeing the design and the architect terry. i'm trying to not miss pronounce that name. but i will say too it's more meaningful to have partner particle from china. that's meaningful to me it will represent our future in tourism in the enlightened challenge of students and there the leadership will open up a lot of conversations with our businesses and argue resident in china to compliment what's going on in san francisco. i can't wait to see those up and in 2015 will be here how we work with all our agencies the particular reason to the d b i and the oothsz other agencies to make sure we compliment not only great transportation and neighborhoods this will be so inspiring for the rest of the country. congratulations to the partnership with china and also carl thank you for being such a great partner. you were there whe
times" about growing up with their single moms in mississippi and making the tough choice to go off to harvard and yale. yes, for them it was a very different choice than it is for most students. it wasn't an easy thing to do. you'll hear their stories coming up. go anywhere in the world, but you had to leave right now, would you go? man: 'oh i can't go tonight' woman: 'i can't.' hero : that's what expedia asked me. host: book the flight but you have to go right now. hero: (laughs) and i just go? this is for real right? this is for real? i always said one day i'd go to china, just never thought it'd be today. anncr: we're giving away a trip every day. download the expedia app and your next trip could be on us. expedia, find yours. from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business. can i get the smith contract, please? thank you. that's three new paper shredders. [ boris ] put 'em on my spark card. [ garth ] boris' small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase every day. great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. read back the chicken's testimony, please
in mississippi to senator john stennis. in the presidential party were bob haldeman and john ehrlichman. >> we were on air force one. we were going off to dedicate a john stennis memorial rocket launcher or something in mississippi. and i'm standing on the flight deck, and it occurred to me for about 30 seconds that i could crash this airplane and that would put an end to everybody's problems. mine, nixon's and haldeman's, everybody who was aboard. i stepped off that airplane, and usually the drill is richard nixon steps off the airplane and all the cameras click away and all that. he got off and nobody paid any attention to him. i got off and boy, they were all taking morgue shots. >> in the very last conversation i had with him there, we were talking about this break-in, in california. the elsberg psychiatrist break-in. and he said, i didn't know about that, did i? and i had to indicate to him that he did know about it. >> that, of course, is a totally out of our -- have you ever heard of this? >> yes, sir. >> i never heard of it, john. i should have been told about that, shouldn't i? >> i'm
louisiana's northeast border near mississippi. alina, what you can tell us? >> reporter: zoraida, this is still a very active scene. we're going to zoom into the bank so you can see the police remain here. investigators continue to comb the bank for vefd. now louisiana state police have identified the alleged hostage-taker as 20-year-old fuaed abdo ahmed. authorities say ahmed walked into this tensas state bank with a gun and took three employees hostage-over the course of 12 you hours, ahmed made several demands, even leased a female hostage. just before midnight, local time, a s.w.a.t. team stormed the bank because the gunman, according to police, threatened to kill the hostages. ahmed was shot dead. police say he shot dead both hostages before he was killed. the man and women were taken to separate hospitals in the area. at last check, according to police, they are listed in critical condition, zoraida. >> alina, thank you very much. we'll continue to check in with you there. >>> we're going to turn now to cairo, we have majoring troubling developments overnight. police have m
continues to impact southeast stretching from mississippi into the carolinas today. the flood level is at moderate level which is going to up the risk of flooding across this area with additional rainfall. looks like it is going to be continuing for the next couple of days. we have the monsoonal showers here but no precipitation to talk about across the area where we have red flag warnings in much of the west. take a look at the temperatures. 30s. the heat from the gulf of mexico surging. toronto looking at 32 degrees. here across europe system in the weakening trend but it is going to still impact much of the central regions as it treks towards the east. gusts, hail and thunderstorms are capable to be unleashed. but the high pressure system covering much of western and central portions here. geneva temperature up to about 30 degrees on your friday. it is going to be on the rising trend. i'll leave you now for your extended forecast. >>> and that's all for this edition of "newsline." i'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. thanks very much for joining us.  ♪ >> the wilson forum is the
every hill and molehill of mississippi and from every mountain side. . i'm angela, and i didn't think i could quit smoking but chantix helped me do it. i told my doctor i think i'm... i'm ready. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. i knew that i could smoke for the first 7 days. i knew that i wasn't putting nicotine back into my body to try to quit. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these, sp chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, or if you develop new or worse symptoms. get me
of mississippi arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought is let freedom ring. >> he played a spiritual song he has been listening to since the childhood. they helped them during the struggles. >> in the words of doctor martin luther king,jr. equality for everyone. freedom. you remind me that i have to be conscious of the inequality that does exist in the world. i don't know how much longer it's going to take with another 50 years or what. we have to keep the march going. >> u.s. secretary of defense chuck hagel joined the minster defense leaders in the southeast asian nations. it contains a number of security challenges including disputes over the south china sea. the agenda was overtaken by events in the mideast and talk of possible u.s. military action against syria. the obama administration identified the asia pacific region as an area of importance for the united states. hagel attended the asean defense minster's meeting on wednesday. he will join a wider discussion on thursday when minsters from china, japan and other countries join their cou
was held to honor his dream. ezra brown is a saxophone player from the state of mississippi. he arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought with him? let freedom ring. ♪ brown played a traditional spiritual song that he has been listening to since his childhood. it's a piece that people in the civil rights movement sang in church to help them during their struggle. >> in the words of dr. martin luther king jr., let's keep in our heart and our mind and our soul about universal peace, equality for everyone, freedom. ♪ >> well, it reminds me that i have to be conscious of the inequalities that does exist now in the world. >> i don't know how much longer it's going to take, if it's going to be another 50 years or what, but we still got a ways to go, you know, and we still got to kind of keep the march going. ♪ >>> a series of bombs have exploded in shia muslim areas in and around the iraqi capital baghdad. the blasts killed at least 40 people. another 160 were wounded. iraqi authorities say insurgents detonated bombs in 14 places including p
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
nfl game full-time may one step closer to the field. of josh elliott on the mississippi woman on the grid with the new orleans saints honeing her skills. >> here we good watch out now. >> bold black and white stripe hair tucked under the black hat this official looks look exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch yourself right here 17. a little tight a little tight. >> but 13-year-old sarah thomas married mother of 3 is on the verge of history. >> are you a tom boy. >> i'm the tom boy yes but i'm married with two boys. >> boys to become the first ever full-time female official for the national football league. >> you got to move up on this pass play. push the guard up. >> individually i'm a female a.lot of things that set us apart individually. race. gender. different back ground. but collectively we are out there all for the same goal. >> escape years of officiating grade school high school and college games she was discovered by an nfl scout. >> he called me one day and said i have an official that i think you need look at. i said okay joe. what is his name
of brotherhood. i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. i have a dream that one day the -- down in alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor have his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, one day down in alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. i have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together. this is our hope. this is the faith that i go back to the south with. with this faith w
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
understand that we have a lot of partners there joining us. .ost: brookhaven, mississippi republican. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing pictures and to do all and how kinds of things. i do not think you all should be doing this. stoph y'all would please showing this on tv. terrorists watch tv. i am highly upset. host: go ahead. guest: maybe i can give you can' come for. this is at a 30,000 foot level. there are much more details that go into it than what i can even describe your today. that there is a great deal of security in and around the ports and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. host: all the information is public information? guest: it is. host: at what point does the government come into play? what it is here, who takes over security? host: security is a joint venturer. when it is under water it is mainly coast guard. when it reaches the earth it is port authority and customs. reporting scanning and certain it isners that open it, federally managed. the state portion as to make sure they are secure. republican caller. hi,
in this effort. >> host: republican line, brookhaven, mississippi. >> caller: yeah, this is mary. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing security staff, showing security staff. you are showing pictures and everything. expected tell them how to get badges and all kinds of things. i don't think john should be doing this. i wish you would please, please telling this on tv. terrorist watch tv. i'm highly upset. >> host: abcaeight. all right. >> guest: maybe i can give you a little bit of comfort. where i have done today is the 30,000-foot level. much, much more detail that goes into it than what i can't even describe today. rest assured that there is a great deal of security in and around the port and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. it does need funding to continue that effort. >> host: of the information you told us i assume is public information. >> guest: it is. >> host: the role of the coast guard and security. at what point did they come into play? and then once the ship is here, who takes over security at that point? >> guest: securit
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
? guest: it is certainly a valid point. host: let's try charles from mississippi. republican line. hi, there. caller: my question to the lady would be that i noticed during this family vacation with the president's family was gone to martha's vineyard, they left bo the dog at home, and sent a marine helicopter to bring it back at a cost of over $300,000. i would like to know why that is not talked about more. host: more about the president there. guest: i do not know where the facts are coming from, but i find that intriguing, and if that is true, that is certainly something reuters would want to know about and write about. i have a long record in journalism looking into the -- exactly that kind of thing. i will take that note home with me. host: a couple of callers are mentioning the white house, and twitter, the same thing. we have been talking about rules congress wrote for itself for travel. you have a sense of how the white house works in this area -- how he decides where they are going? is anyone oversee those decisions because we are hearing it from callers? guest: i do not kno
separation of the mississippi river basin from the great lakes, hoping against hope to stop the advance of one very aggressive fish, a fish that is just one part of a far bigger problem. our cover story is reported now by mark strassman. >> reporter: meet the king of the illinois river. >> wow. reporter: and a big show-off. mask lar. ... muscular. very muscular. >> reporter: i mean, this thing will hurt you. >> yes, yes. it can jump out of the water at high speeds. they can jump a great distance out of the water, up to eight feet out of the water. >> reporter: fast, easy to startle, and voracious eaters, asian silver carp are a jarring sight here and a hit on youtube tube. but fisheries research scientist greg sass says in the long history of this water way what's also remarkable is when this fish got here. just 20 years ago. >> by the mid 2000's it was becoming a crisis. not only were fish jumping everywhere but what was showing up in our catches, the amount of asian carp versus the native fishes. >> reporter: just amazing how wide it is. with no natural predators in this stretch of th
to go back. all of that plus breaking news. there was a miracle today in oxford, mississippi. reinforced with scratch- resistant glass and a unibody made kevlar strong. okay google now. call my droid. the new droid ultra by motorola. when strength matters, droid does. ♪ the joint is jumpin' osteo bi-flex® helps strengthen your joints.° like calcium supplements can help your bones, osteo bi-flex can help your joints.° osteo bi-flex... the best stuff in the joint.™ now in joint and muscle formula. >> shepard: u.s. senator ted cruz says nothing against canada but is he an american. he was indeed born in canada but his mother is a u.s. citizen. he says he actually has dual citizenship both countries. now he plans to give up the canadian citizenship. senator cruz recently won a straw poll of 2016 conservative denver. made two trips to iowa. home of the nation's first in the nation presidential contest and staffers say this week is he planning to visit new hampshire. the first primary state san diego mayor bob filner is trying to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit against him from the c
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
senator from mississippi joins us. we will see you tomorrow night. night. good night from new york. ♪ ...and ev stop itself if it has to. the technology may be hard to imagine... but why you wod want it isot. ♪ the 2014 e-clas it doesn't just see the fure, it is the future. neil: and here you were worried about them collecting your phone records. tens of the nsa has been collecting more than that. forget about every color we make. try every e-mail we right, every chat room in which we have a chance. what we type, where we browsed, how long we have been browsing, everything we point and click catalog to by an agency his abuses are pathetic and sick. here is what is even more alarming. they're still doing it. they are doing more of it. slocum, everybody. i'm neil cavuto, and it is enough to make even james bond blush.
the opportunity to stand on the deck of a new bridge over the mississippi river, 16 feet board to go. i could watch this go down the nations greatest river. theas an awesome view. people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. obeying hiss is ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. great examplet that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. thosek forward to engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. have traveled around the country, seeing
flight delays. we do have flash flood watches and warnings up and down the mississippi river because of the additional rain that we'll also get today. we also have the threat of stronger storms like this afternoon into this evening. just to the east of the rockies into the western plains, biggest threat would be for damaging wind gusts and also for some small hail possible, isolated tornadoes are a possibility but not really a huge threat. temperatures today, really hot down south, well above 100 degrees. cool up north, especially in and around the great lakes region. tomorrow back into the mid 80s. 90s in kansas city. scattered showers and storms will spread into the east as we go into tomorrow. temperatures in the northeast will stay cool and comfortable for one more day. that heat will also spread eastward as we go into tomorrow. brian. >> dylan, thank you very much. going to sports stories, tiger woods looks pretty good going into the final major of the season. still number one in the world. don't forget that. he virtually lapped the field. it was kind of a joke. he took a seven-
george. >>, in mississippi, in alabama, people were struggling to have the right to citizenship, the right to vote, the right to public accommodations. people were being jailed and this was a culmination of those efforts to come to washington and petition the federal government to intervene and insure that in fact all citizens have equal treatment. >> annie, you were there, too, 50 years ago. again, you were there today for the march today. how did being there in 1963 impact who you became no. life. i was 17, and i had a summer job. i was on my way to college and i realized that there were people all over the country who i was aworking class examined kid of immigrant parents but still had this genetic advantage and needed to go down and say i'm standing with everyone else, because it was so important. i went into college thinking i would be a high school english teacher and i said no, i needed to go into journalism to stand up, bear witness and maybe make a difference. >> martha, you've written about the ways in which the women were at times overlooked. there was only one woman
, mississippi and several other places. >> julian, do you remember? >> several people supporting the march were asked to donate staff to the march and i was donated to the march on washington committee. got john's speech, the original speech -- that went to members of the press who were seated down below lincoln. i passed out the copies of john's speech. i pointed out to them that john would be the only speaker speaking that day to talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people. i thought and we thought this demonstration showed how different we were and superior we were to the other civil rights organizations. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? vix i meant aggressive. i did not mean anything harmful. i have always been upset by people who say "oh, you are so militant." it is not equate abu with violence. it just means someone aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. i thought we were more militant than the other groups gathered there. >> what was the magic of dr. king? martin luther king jr., more than any other leader of our times, had the capacity and the to define, but
them. some of them had to be cut on the bottom by hand. such is life on the mississippi, on -- what is the date on that? i can't read it. 1875. this book isn't that old. it's from the 20's or the 30's. i have the complete set of that edition. that is part of what got me by ian all these other books because when i found this set there were six or eight volumes missing. when i finally found out which ones were missing, i was on my way to becoming a full-fledged collector. so i finally collected all of those volumes for this particular set so it's complete. and in the meantime, i also collected several other complete sets like the one on the top which is basically the same books, they are just from a different publisher. then the ones in the middle with the yellow dust covers those are from the mark twain project in berkeley. they had been putting out scholarly editions for many years. and i have all of those. then on this wall over here are books about mark twain. also my 1601 collection this year. i'm not sure that it's appropriate for mixed company but there was a little racy story
. is great to hear and i'm originally from mississippi and grew up in this south where my parents graduated from school. i dropped out of school but eventually i went back and went to college and moved to ohio and got a job. even the church and some time that people buy your history in america and how we treat one another and even the slavery. i'm a big fan of frederick douglass also. in a piece that he wrote, he writes the real question that all commanding question here is whether american justice and american liberty and american civilization, the american christianity can be made to include and protect all the rights of all american children. as black people we feel not educated by history and other countries and you know as i talk to people from where i came from my struggles with my parents if you live in the south, even sometimes the black people seem like they have not comprehended what i'm talking about. the struggle and where we came from and where we are now. >> host: let's get a response from randall robinson. >> guest: well, i understand very much how you feel. i think that you
of the flood mitigation program that the corps of engineers engages in, we are losing much of the mississippi delta. up theseeep putting barriers to keep the channel of the river to keep it from going onto croplands and housing developments, you are losing all the silt to create the barrier islands to build up that delta to allow for the land to keep being recharged. this is part of the law of unintended consequences. housingep encouraging development closer and closer to coasts and rivers, you are losing nature's ability to mitigate itself. guest: you are absolutely right. that is one of the issues of how we manage the mississippi river and how it affects louisiana along with natural subsidence and the issues of canals for oil and gas drilling and the of those nature. provided are has withe either to wetlands dunes and beaches and as we encroach on that, we are reducing the ability for mother nature to respond and be able to protect us and that increases our flood losses. hurricane result of sandy, more than 30,000 buildings in new york city were in a flood controlled area that is now -- th
rescues along the beach. the choppy surf driven by the winds. >>> southern mississippi is drying up after almost six inches of rain fell in two hours. cars stuck and fire crews having to come out to help all the people. officials there handed out stand bags to protect the homes at risk of being inundated with the water. >>> can you imagine this? people went to church. by the time they left, the parking lot was full. some of they had waded out to their cars. the water did eventually go down and they were able to head home. >> good gracious, this is incredible. not that we are blaming you, but we are looking for explanations. >> this is incredible. at this point, month after month. we started this trend of drenching the southeast in june. july, setting records. it is august and we are still talking about an incredible amount of tropical moisture. the influx into the south. you can see, this is the area we are watching. each day, that moisture got closer. combined with a stationary front, they brought together unbelievable amounts of rainfall. i want to show you how far over the average, alo
. you saw selma in the 1965 voting rights act. you saw the mississippi summer project in the 1964 civil rights bill. you saw affirmative action, you saw all of these things grow out of that. you saw an effort to empower marginalize eed people across te country. we used the model we were using in terms of organizing and sex-determination pulling people together so they could take control of their own lives. those models were actually both things that grew out of the movement. washington is one of those epic points that there are a number of other epic points that actually pulled this whole process together. i think it's important to understand that even on the struggles on the march on washington, get the message out. >>ifill: we are still having big national conversations as they say about race, still coming out of the trayvon martin episode. and i wonder as you look back we wonder whether it's leadership that's missing, whether we're just not honest as a people in discussing these issues or whether we've come much further than they give us credit for? >> i think we have come a long way
of mississippi just as well. there is not a state that is not impacted by florida. they do the best job with it. but they are all states that have issues with structurally deficient bridges. gerri: an impressive report. i bet you might be originally from the south. iredell of bevan accent. >> just a little bit. it's an important issue. i believe so. gerri: well, onto the market. it is the fear index, the vix or folacin -- volatility index. it turns out it may not be the best way to spot risk. we watch the vix every single day here at fox business, but you say really the vision is limited. why? >> it does a good job of doing that. most investors are more interested once by an outside the u.s. and had to adjust the stock market and are more interested in what might happen 30 days down the road. gerri: that is a great point. alito's is a much. the s&p 500 is not debatable window into what is done in the market. we will be the better index to think about, the indices, hence, clues of where to look at what to think about. >> a shot tillich's something outside of the u.s., many opportunities. concern
lou in greenwood, mississippi, james orange an activist in birmingham, alabama. jose williams. i thought of those people, i thought of baker, and so when i thought of them, i began to cry. i began to cry, because i knew that there contribution had changed america, by the way, i said this directly to the president of the united states. i reminded him yesterday when i had the honor to see him in the reception, even when he was out in california. i -- and you know, he knows this, that when he was elected, for example and there were several people at a faculty home celebrating the election of barack obama. and people in the room started to cry, and someone said to me, professor jones, did you think you live long enough to see an african-american elected president? i said no. but excuse me, my tears are not for the election of barack obama's president. my tears are for all of those persons that i personally knew, personally knew -- i called them wintertime soldiers, who made his election possible. and the president today and even earlier, he reflected that in the very poignant and mov
klux klan skyrockets, you have the mississippi codes, which began in 1877 and were crystallized in 1901. it deprived blacks of being able to own property. restricts voting rights. for example, in mississippi. and i think in 1871, 97% of african-american men can vote in the state of mississippi. when hayes and's reconstruction, 10 years later, less than 1.5% of african-american men can the.the violence, intimidation, the grandfather's clause, the poll tax. it is really two separate nations where african-americans emboldened by frederick douglass in the north began to really organize and begin to secure the rights while the south have theirs stripped away.>> mike is watching us in honolulu. you are on. go ahead. >> can you hear me? >> yes, thanks. >> it is hawaii standard time. i have a direct relative to my grandmother, of course.her name is jesse hayes. she was born in 1870. in the lower midwest.probably, by blood, long removed. i looked at this beautiful lucy sitting in the chair, looking at the camera with those big eyes, and her beautiful children looking at the camera. obviously,mpr
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary --ace because emmett till was because emmett till was murdered there. and yet, when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. host: michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. caller: yeah, hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who they are in good complaining -- -- quit and planning. guest: who was complaining? caller: well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- guest: why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain you know, get over what happened in the past. guest: you are from th
themselves. >> host: on our line for independents. randy in west point, mississippi. >> caller: good morning! >> host: good morning. >> caller: if the ports in savannah, georgia going to be upgraded for the new tanker ships? thank you. >> guest: the the port of savannah is currently in the process of working in the corp. of engineer and the federal government to deepen the savannah river so it will be able to accommodate larger vessel the project is underway in term of that investment and improvement. similarly in gulf port, mississippi. as you know, that port was significantly impacted by katrina a few years ago. as part of the process of rebuilding and revitallyization of the mississippi coastline there's activity involved in terms of improvements and investment in and around the port or gulf port to both revitalize that community that have devastated by the hurricane, but also importantly to be able to handle the new type of vessel that will be transiting in to the gulf of mexico in a few short years. >> we have about fifteen minutes left with our guest. he's the president and chief execu
in mississippi and make you jump through hoops. the shwag the federal government is growing isn't that good anyway and doesn't let you study a lot of different strains. it could be so simple and easy to do actual scientific research on marijuana but the government stands in the way. >> where is the obama administration on this part of the question? where has the obama administration been on the scientific question here? >> scientifically they've been great. they've said, look, we're not going to get in the way of the states. this is what they've said. the states that have passed medical marijuana laws. in practice, the d.e.a. has been kicking in doors in california, washingt washington, montana, colorado. wherever there's a medical marijuana law, there are u.s. attorneys there spending a lot of time and resources to try to tackle what they see as a problem. it takes six to nine months, a former administration official told me, to run one of these investigations on a pot shop. these pot shops are advertising in the yellowbook and in the alt weeklies and have store fronts with pot leaves on t
's day that bridge collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. 13 people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than 13 months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the
rate. in fact, only five states have a higher one. nevada, illinois, mississippi, rhode island and north carolina. pretty stunning. by the way, christie has kept a football field's worth of distance between himself and controversial gop senate nominee. but finally decide to endorse him at an event on tuesday. the first and last time chris christie probably campaigning with him. washington chief correspondent dan balls. and political eder to for the degreo.com harry bacon jr. and liz showny from the associated press. mr. balls, we have dined out on candidates starting presidential campaigns early for decades. in some ways, we love it as political junkies. what's surprising is when front-runners who don't need to do it dip in too early. hillary clinton, dipping too fast? >> i'm not sure. i think you're right. part of this is driven by us. >> doesn't take much to feed -- >> our april tied petite to get next campaign grows so that's part of it. the other is could she avoid it anyway? she's being drawn into the conversation in a sense whether she contributes to it or not. the fact t
was assassinated in his own driveway in mississippi. we were a very different country. the original march on washington for jobs and freedom which took place august 28, 1963 was a call to action, not just to citizens of all colors who were concerned about civil rights but to politicians. in fact, the original march was mainly directed at little leaders in congress and in the white house to follow through on president kennedy's push for a civil rights bill which passed the following year. 50 years later, the supreme court's conservative majority including its lone black member have gutted the voting rights act passed two years after the march in 1965. states are rolling back access to health care for women and the working class. it's under constant attack. we are a different country but still have a fight 0 our hands. so when you watch the coverage commemorating the march remember the call to action is political because it always has been. thanks so much for watching. "hardball" with chris matthews is next. >>> hillary's ahead of schedule but who is driving the bus? let's play "hardball."
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